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PEOPLE WITH A
PASSION FOR PEACE

Since 1995, the all-volunteer and interfaith peaceCENTER continues to be a significant community catalyst for peace in San Antonio, Texas. Compassion and Justice are our strong guiding lights. Contemplative Practices, Experiential Education, and Nonviolent Actions are our working expressions throughout the community at large.

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285 Oblate Drive
San Antonio, Texas 78216

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Book TV (CSPAN-2) on Saturday is featuring the Mississippi Book Festival which has a LOT of programming about civil rights, then and now. Looks like a great way to spend what could be a rainy Saturday! ... See MoreSee Less

THIS WEEKEND ON BOOK TV 2016 MISSISSIPPI BOOK FESTIVAL LIVE - SAT 11am - 6:15pm ET Here's this year's schedule: @ 11:00am - A New Generation Speaks about Race @ 12:15pm - Education @ 1:30pm - Ci...

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A look at how to make peace. ... See MoreSee Less

This former CIA officer's secret life taught her one lesson: Listen to your enemy.

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Nobel Peace Prize: 1977

1977AmnestyIntl31977mumtaz-soysal
The 1977 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Amnesty International, based in the United Kingdom, for protecting the human rights of prisoners of conscience. The Nobel Lecture was delivered by Mümtaz Soysal (pictured), a Turkish academic, the first former prisoner of conscience to serve on the International Executive Committee of Amnesty International. He said, “Peace is not to be measured by the absence of conventional war, but constructed upon foundations of justice. Where there is injustice, there is the seed of conflict. Where human rights are violated, there are threats to peace.”

The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the five Nobel Prizes created by the Swedish industrialist, inventor, and armaments manufacturer Alfred Nobel. Since 1901 it has been awarded annually (with some exceptions) to those who have “done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses” Over the next few months we’ll be introducing you to the past Nobel laureates, leading up to the award of the 2016 prize in October.

August 29 in Peace & Justice History

August 29, 430
Augustine died in Hippo (now Annaba, Algeria) with a Vandal army outside the gates of the city. Augustine had developed the theory of a “just war” and said a nation’s leaders must consider among other things, anticipated loss of civilian life and whether all peaceful options have been exhausted before war starts.

August 29 in Peace & Justice History

August 29, 1958
Britain’s Notting Hill Riots began when a gang of white youths attacked a Swedish woman, Majbritt Morrison. The youths had seen her the previous night arguing with her Jamaican husband, Raymond, at Latimer Road tube station. This led to a series of violent demonstrations against non-white West Indians in the ethnically diverse northwest London neighborhood of Notting Hill and first drew public attention to the growing problem of racial tension in Britain.

Monday’s Monument: Peace, Love and Unity, Nairobi, Kenya

Monday’s Monument: Peace, Love and Unity, Nairobi, Kenya

Or, as they say in Kiswahili, Amani, Upendo And Umoja. This fountain is in the 76-acre Uhuhru (Freedom) Park in central Nairobi, which was established by Jomo Kenyatta, the first president of Kenya. It was here that a crowd of more than 40,000 gathered to watch the proceedings as the Union Jack was lowered and Kenya was declared independent from Britain in 1963. The fountain was installed by Kenyatta’s successor, Daniel arap Moi (1978-2002.) As president, Moi developed the Nyayo philosophy, a Kiswahili word meaning “footsteps,” stressing the Kenyatta legacy and adding new national values of love, peace and unity. The words are part of the national pledge: “I pledge my loyalty to the president and the nation of Kenya. My readiness and duty to defend the flag of our republic. My devotion to the words of our national anthem. My life and strength in the task of our nation’s building. In the living spirit embodied in our national motto – Harambee! [Pull Together] And perpetuated in the Nyayo philosophy of peace love and unity.” In practice, the Moi regime became a repressive one, and peace, love and unity often meant acquiescing to Moi and his ruling party.

Nobel Peace Prize: 1976

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The 1976 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Betty Williams and Mairead Corrigan, of the  United Kingdom, founders of the Northern Ireland Peace Movement (later renamed Community of Peace People.) In her Nobel lecture Betty Williams said,

“Compassion is more important than intellect, in calling forth the love that the work of peace needs, and intuition can often be a far more powerful searchlight than cold reason. We have to think, and think hard, but if we do not have compassion before we even start thinking, then we are quite likely to start fighting over theories. The whole world is divided ideologically, and theologically, right and left, and men are prepared to fight over their ideological differences. Yet the whole human family can be united by compassion.”

The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the five Nobel Prizes created by the Swedish industrialist, inventor, and armaments manufacturer Alfred Nobel. Since 1901 it has been awarded annually (with some exceptions) to those who have “done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses” Over the next few months we’ll be introducing you to the past Nobel laureates, leading up to the award of the 2016 prize in October.

Happy Birthday, Peacemakers!

August 28, 1828
Leo Tolstoy
“Truth, like gold, is to be obtained not by its growth, but by washing away from it all that is not gold.”

August 29, 1862
Maurice Maeterlinck
“At every crossroads on the path that leads to the future, tradition has placed 10,000 men to guard the past.”

September 3, 1963
Malcolm Gladwell
“The injunction to be nice is used to deflect criticism and stifle the legitimate anger of dissent.”

August 28 in Peace & Justice History

August 28, 1957
Senator Strom Thurmond (D-SC) began a 24 hour and 18 minute filibuster against a civil rights bill.  Thurmond read, verbatim, the voting laws of each one of the 48 states.  He read the U.S. criminal code.  He read a Supreme Court decision, followed by more laws. Thurmond read the Declaration of Independence. Nevertheless, the Senate passed the bill, which established the U.S. Civil Rights Commission that “stud[ies] alleged deprivations of voting rights and alleged discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin, or in the administration of justice.”  The act also instituted new bans on interfering with the rights of persons to vote for the President and members of Congress. It was the first civil right legislation passed in 80 years.

Nobel Peace Prize: 1975

1975sakharov
The 1975 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Andrei Dmitrievich Sakharov, of the Soviet Union, for his struggle for human rights, for disarmament, and for cooperation between all nations. Sakharov, a physicist, was the father of the Soviet hydrogen bomb. The leaders of the Soviet Union refused Sakharov permission to travel to Oslo to receive the Prize and deprived of all his Soviet honorary titles. For several years, he and his wife were kept under strict surveillance in the city of Gorky. Only when Gorbachev came to power in 1985 were they allowed to return to Moscow.

The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the five Nobel Prizes created by the Swedish industrialist, inventor, and armaments manufacturer Alfred Nobel. Since 1901 it has been awarded annually (with some exceptions) to those who have “done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses” Over the next few months we’ll be introducing you to the past Nobel laureates, leading up to the award of the 2016 prize in October.

August 27 in Peace & Justice History


August 27, 2008
In Honolulu Marcus Eriksen and fellow eco-mariner Joel Paschal celebrated the end of their 2,600-mile voyage on what they call the JUNK raft. They had spent three months crossing the Pacific on a raft made of plastic bottles to raise awareness of ocean debris. Research suggested that every square kilometer of the ocean has an average of 13,000 pieces of plastic floating in it. The floating portion was thought to make up only 15% of marine litter.

Nobel Peace Prize: 1974

1974macbride1974sato
The 1974 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Seán MacBride, of Ireland, President of the International Peace Bureau; President of the Commission of Namibia. “For his strong interest in human rights: piloting the European Convention on Human Rights through the Council of Europe, helping found and then lead Amnesty International and serving as secretary-general of the International Commission of Jurists” and to Eisaku Satō, the Prime Minister of Japan, “for his renunciation of the nuclear option for Japan and his efforts to further regional reconciliation.” MacBride began his Nobel Lecture: “We are living in a world where war, violence, brutality and ever increasing armament dominate the thinking of humanity . . . humanity itself gives the appearance of having become numbed or terrified by its own impotence in the face of disaster.”

The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the five Nobel Prizes created by the Swedish industrialist, inventor, and armaments manufacturer Alfred Nobel. Since 1901 it has been awarded annually (with some exceptions) to those who have “done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses” Over the next few months we’ll be introducing you to the past Nobel laureates, leading up to the award of the 2016 prize in October.

August 26 in Peace & Justice History


August 26, 2012
In Togo, women in the civil rights group “Let’s Save Togo” said they would have a week-long sex strike to demand the resignation of President Faure Gnassingbé.

Nobel Peace Prize: 1973

1973kissinger1973leductho

The Prize was not awarded in 1972. The 1973 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Henry Kissinger, of the United States, and to Le Duc Tho, of North Vietnam, for the  Paris agreement intended to bring about a cease-fire in the Vietnam war and a withdrawal of the American forces. Le Duc Tho declined the prize. In her award ceremony speech, Mrs. Aase Lionaes, Chairman of the Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Storting noted: “This year’s Nobel Prize winner has been called a realist. . . His preoccupation has been the responsibility of the statesman in an imperfect and multifarious world, full of danger. Now he himself bears the burden of such responsibility.”

The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the five Nobel Prizes created by the Swedish industrialist, inventor, and armaments manufacturer Alfred Nobel. Since 1901 it has been awarded annually (with some exceptions) to those who have “done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses” Over the next few months we’ll be introducing you to the past Nobel laureates, leading up to the award of the 2016 prize in October.

  1. #SASpeakUp on the 2017 Budget

    August 22 @ 5:30 pm - September 1 @ 7:30 pm
  2. Diapers in Detention

    August 30 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  3. Rally and Citizens to be Heard

    August 31 @ 4:30 pm - 8:00 pm
  4. International Overdose Awareness Day

    August 31 @ 5:00 pm - 7:30 pm
  5. Social Justice Happy Hour

    August 31 @ 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
  6. Celebrating Mercy From Paranoia to Metanoia w/ Rev. Ron Rolheiser, OMI

    August 31 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
  7. Day of Prayer for Our Common Home

    September 1 @ 2:00 pm - 7:00 pm
  8. The Sacred Art of Altars: One People, Many Paths Opening

    September 1 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
  9. Borderland Opening Reception

    September 1 @ 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
  10. Film Showing: Occupation of the American Mind

    September 1 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

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